College Credit Courses Search

Arts & Humanities Classes
CollegeCourse
Baruch College

Journalistic Writing
Course Number: JRN 3050
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of journalism - reporting, researching, and writing news and feature articles, with a focus on fairness, accuracy, balance, and thoroughness. The course involves intensive writing and reporting; students will produce 8 to 10 written assignments, including in-class news-writing assignments, longer feature pieces, and thorough rewrites of stories that have been critiqued by the professor. Students will cover stories on a range of topics, most of which will be culled from their own communities. Assignments are designed to give students an introduction to reporting on both individuals and institutions. Interviewing techniques, database research, and writing style will be developed during the semester. Students will also be expected to read the newspaper and understand the important stories and issues of the day.

Bronx Community College

Digital Imaging
Course Number: ART 84
Spring | 2 credits

A course concerned with Digital Imaging for Print, the World Wide Web and Multimedia. Students will experiment with scanned and self-generated images using industry-standard (currently Photoshop) imaging software. Integration with other applications will be a goal. The software program's prodigious versatility will be applied to the merging and transformation of photographic images in creative and unexpected ways. Professional level skills in this area, vital to a graphic design professional will be emphasized.

Bronx Community College

Drawing (open to University Heights HS students only)
Course Number: ART 21
Spring | 2 credits

Studio course to develop basic skills and concepts in drawing. Emphasis on drawing anatomy and portraits. Use of different mediums and techniques. Students draw from professional models.

Bronx Community College

Painting (open to University Heights HS students only)
Course Number: ART 22
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Studio course to develop basic skills and concepts in painting in oil and acrylics. Fundamentals of form, color, texture, and composition as applied to still life, landscape, portraits, figure studies, and abstraction. Development of student's personal style.

Bronx Community College

User Interface Design
Course Number: ART 87
Spring | 2 credits

This course focuses on the aesthetic design of user interfaces for web and mobile. Students learn the process of planning and designing interactive systems, creating flowcharts and mockups, and are introduced to professional Web Design software. Projects include various graphics for the Web, UI (User Interface) Design, HTML templates, and more.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Critical Thinking
Course Number: CRT 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Critical Thinking (Same as CRT 100) is designed to develop the mind and help students learn to think clearly and effectively. Through substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions, students will examine concrete examples from their own experience and readings and contemporary issues in the media to learn how to analyze issues, solve problems, and make informed decisions in their academic, professional, and personal lives.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

English Composition I
Course Number: ENG 101
3 credits

This is the first college-level writing course. Readings are used to stimulate critical thinking and to provide students with models for effective writing. Students become acquainted with the process of writing, from pre-writing activities to producing a final, proofread draft. Grammar and syntax are discussed as needed. At the end of this course, students take a departmental essay examination that requires them to compose, draft and edit a thesis-centered of at least 500 words.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Introduction to Human Services and Social Work
Course Number: HUM 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course introduces students to the field of Human Services and the profession of Social Work. Those human services which deal with social and personal problems are explored as well as the knowledge base, the skills base and the values base of the social work profession. Students are exposed to the methods of working with people as individuals, in groups and on a community level. This course meets the requirements as a liberal arts elective in social science.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Introduction to Video Technology
Course Number: VAT 100
Fall | 2 credits

This course explains how video technology works. It covers the fundamentals of contemporary media technology including understanding video image formation, data compression, picture and sound generation and manipulation, and the impact of new technologies, such as HD-TV and P2P. Lab exercises introduce students to the operations of cameras, video-recording systems, microphones, and the uses of SMPTE Time Code. Students also examine systems for delivering media to the viewer, including webcast, broadcast, and satellite and cable distribution.

Brooklyn College

Ethics and Personal Relations
Course Number: PHIL 6.5
Spring | 3 credits

Critical examination of issues in personal ethics. Moral obligations to self, family, friends, love partners, neighbors, schoolmates, coworkers. Autonomy and integrity; responsibility and special obligation. Discussion of such topics as suicide, substance abuse, marriage, divorce, love and sex, parent-child relations, surrogacy, gambling, lying, and cheating. Conceptions of family, work, and leisure. Classical and contemporary philosophers.

Brooklyn College

Ethics and Society
Course Number: PHIL 6
Fall | 3 credits

Critical consideration of issues in social ethics. Discussion of such topics as racism and sexism, economic justice, civil disobedience, capital punishment, environmental pollution, nuclear power and weaponry, abortion, euthanasia, freedom of information, the right to privacy.

Brooklyn College

Introduction to Psychology
Course Number: PSYCH 1000
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

City College of New York

Acting I
Course Number: THTR 13600
3 credits

Principles and practice of acting. Introduction to relaxation, concentration, self awareness, inner objects, outer activities, objectives and obstacles, ensemble work, circle of belief, text analysis. Consideration of work ethic and professionalism. Basic scene and monologue exploration.

City College of New York

Freshman Composition
Course Number: ENGL 11000
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The longer paper, and practice in essay forms.

City College of New York

Intro to Philosophy
Course Number: PHIL 10200
Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to some of the central questions of philosophy, concerning our knowledge of the external world, causation, God, mind and body, freedom, justice, and moral judgment, via analysis of classical and contemporary philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Mill, Kant, Russell, Wittgenstein and Rawls.

College of Staten Island

Introduction to Film
Course Number: CIN 100
Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to the terms and methods of film analysis. The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound narrative, authorship, genre, and ideology

College of Staten Island

Orchestra II / Orchestra IV (Curtis High School)
Course Number: MUS 165/265
Spring | 2 credits

Continuation of MUS 164. Rehearsal and performance of orchestral literature from all periods. Continuation of MUS 264. Rehearsal and performance of orchestral literature from all periods. May be repeated for credit.

Hostos Community College

Acting I for ESL students
Course Number: VPA 181
Spring | 3 credits

Students will execute physical and vocal exercises; do dramatic improvisations and readings; execute ensemble exercises, exercises; act from scripted scenes; and perform in public. This class gives priority to students who have successfully completed ESL 037 course with College Now.

Hostos Community College

Expository Writing
Course Number: ENG 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

English 110, a foundational writing course, is designed to strengthen students' composing skills so that they will produce increasingly complex and better-structured essays. Reading and responding to interdisciplinary texts representing various rhetorical modes, students will practice paraphrasing and summarizing these texts, enrich their vocabulary, and improve their writing, revision, and proofreading skills. Additionally, students will be introduced to the use of print and on-line secondary sources. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to respond critically, in writing, to a variety of texts, integrating their own ideas with those presented in the readings.

Hostos Community College

Literature for ESL Students III
Course Number: ESL 37
Spring | 1 credit

This three-hour advanced-level ESL course provides students with the opportunity to further develop their linguistic and critical thinking skills through extensive reading, interpretation, and analysis of authentic literary texts. These texts, selected for their relevance and literary value, include a variety of genres (fiction, memoir, poetry and drama). The course will also provide cultural and historical perspectives necessary to construct meaning from these texts. Students will deepen their understanding of literary elements such as point of view, character, plot, setting, irony and figurative language and employ them in their analysis. Assessment of student performance will be based on in-class discussion, personal-response essays and other forms of writing that require students to compare and contrast themes and issues raised by texts.

Hostos Community College

The African American Experience
Course Number: BLS 114
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Students will be introduced, through a series of guided readings, to the experiences of peoples of African descent from Africa’s genesis through the middle passage, slavery emancipation, the reconstruction and the aftermath of de jure slavery in the Americas; including the literary, economic, socio-psychological, and cultural aspects of the African –American experience.

Hostos Community College

Thinking and Reasoning
Course Number: PHI 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

In this course, the student will become familiar with the vocabulary of philosophical thinking and develop thinking and logical reasoning skills needed for academic performance. Study topics will include: reasoning, analysis of arguments, forms and uses of inferences, assertions, explanations, generalizations, analogies and fallacies. The examination of the topics discussed will serve to facilitate the application of clear thinking and logical reasoning to the student's mental, verbal, and writing process.

Hunter College

Expository Writing
Course Number: ENGL 120
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Trains students to analyze, develop, and evaluate ideas and to express themselves clearly and effectively.

Hunter College

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Course Number: ANTHC 101
Fall | 3 credits

Comparative and historical examination of the human condition through a focus on diverse responses, such as making a living, resolving conflict, organizing family/kin relations and finding meaning in the world.

Hunter College

Introduction to Media Studies
Course Number: MEDIA 180
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Social, political, and economic factors that determine and shape products of media organizations.

Hunter College

Music Theory Fundamentals
Course Number: MUSTH 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to music theory, sight singing, and ear training.

Hunter College

The Greek and Latin Roots of English
Course Number: CLA 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Elements of language structure; how languages work; elements of Latin and Greek in English vocabulary.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

College Composition I
Course Number: ENG 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The fundamentals of composition, including sentence and paragraph development, diction and style. Examination of essay structure and development. Assigned themes introducing such rhetorical forms as description, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, argumentation. The incorporation of quoted material in essays.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Intermediate French
Course Number: FRE 202
Spring | 3 credits

Emphasis on conversation with some written work based on contemporary prose selections.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Introduction to Theatre
Course Number: DRA 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The course provides an introduction to the study of drama and theatre, including playwriting, directing, acting, design, and technical theatre. Historical influences and production elements and values are explored. The course is designed to enhance the student's enjoyment and understanding of the theatrical experience. Plays, performances, films, demonstrations and lectures acquaint the students with the history and techniques of the theatrical arts. There may be some opportunity for student performance. No experience in dramatic production is required.

Kingsborough Community College

Foundations for College-Level Reading and Writing for ESL Students, 1
Course Number: ESL BW
Fall | 0 credits

Low, intermediate portfolio, based course designed to help students develop the fluency, focus, analytical and organizational skills needed to become successful college writers and pass ELA Regents and college placement exams. Readings assigned from various genres and of varying lengths.

Kingsborough Community College

Foundations for College-Level Writing
Course Number: ENG BW
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Develop ability to write in a logical and coherent style with emphasis on how to prepare well organized material that says what the writer wants to say.

Kingsborough Community College

Humanities: Freedom and Control: Culture in the 20th Century
Course Number: HUM 1
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Course explores literature, drama, art, and music in today's world. Attempts are made to place 20th century developments into an historical context and illustrate the continuity of culture.

Kingsborough Community College

Intensive Writing 1
Course Number: ENG W
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Students will create portfolios based on freshman-level reading assignments. The interdisciplinary focus will be Science at the Core. Development of critical thinking and writing skills needed for freshman college experience will be emphasized.

LaGuardia Community College

Basic Writing
Course Number: ENE 99
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Basic Writing is designed to introduce and develop college level writing proficiency through careful attention to the writing process. Emphasizing both the writing process and skills needed for timed and high stakes essays, such as the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing (CATW), this course will prepare students for English Department 130 college level writing. Students will learn text based writing in the short essay form to clearly express ideas in edited U.S. English that integrate analysis of a written text. Prerequisite: ESL/ESR099, Students must demonstrate readiness for learning college-level writing proficiency as indicated by their score on the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing (CATW) Exam.

LaGuardia Community College

Basic Writing for Non-Native Speakers of English
Course Number: ESA 099
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

This course aims at developing college-level writing proficiency. By emphasizing the writing process, rhetorical conventions, summary writing, paraphrasing and analytical language skills, the course will prepare students for timed, high-stakes essays, such as the CATW. In addition, students will learn to identify and correct grammatical errors in their own compositions and learn to employ argumentative and other rhetorical modes in a short essay form to clearly express ideas written in academic English.

LaGuardia Community College

Beginning Drawing
Course Number: HUA 103
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course is an introduction to drawing through basic examination of the visual fundamentals of line, texture, value, space and form. Problems in descriptive drawing will be explored. There will be individual and group criticism. Sketchbooks are required.

LaGuardia Community College

Beginning Painting
Course Number: HUA 110
3 credits

This course is an introduction to painting techniques related to landscape, still life and abstract composition. Emphasis will be on color expression and color mixing. There will be individual and group critiques.

LaGuardia Community College

Composition I
Course Number: ENG 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

In this course students focus on the process of writing clear, correct and effective expository essays in response to materials drawn from culturally diverse sources. Emphasis is placed on using various methods of organization appropriate to the writer's purpose and audience. Students are introduced to argumentation, fundamental research methods and documentation procedures. Students write frequently both in and out of class.

LaGuardia Community College

Critical Thinking
Course Number: HUP 102
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course explores the process of thinking critically and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively. Concrete examples from students' experience and contemporary issues help students develop the abilities to solve problems, analyze issues, and make informed decisions in their academic, career and personal lives. Substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions help students develop language skills while fostering sophisticated thinking abilities.

LaGuardia Community College

Introduction to Travel, Tourism & Hospitality Management
Course Number: BTT 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course is an overview of the travel, tourism and hospitality industry. It explores the structures, products and services of industry suppliers, such as transportation companies, attractions, hotels and other lodging providers, and of marketing organizations, such as travel agencies, tour packagers and destination-promotion organizations. The course also traces the evolution of the industry and explores its role in contemporary life.

LaGuardia Community College

Principles of Communication, Non-Native Speakers
Course Number: HUC 102
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course introduces non-native speakers to the basic principles of communication, such as concepts of interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking, in a variety of cultural contexts. In addition, students will learn the principles of articulation, phonetics, and introductory sociolinguistics.

LaGuardia Community College

The Art of Theatre
Course Number: HUT 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the study of theatre, including playwriting, directing, acting, design and technical theatre. No experience in dramatic production is required. Lecture discussions, performances, demonstrations, films, tapes and guest appearances by theatre professionals will be included. This course is intended as the gateway course into the theatre major.

Lehman College

Contemporary Moral Issues
Course Number: PHI 172
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Fundamental ethical theories and their applications to current moral issues, such as capital punishment, abortion, sexual equality, economic justice, and issues in medical and other professional ethics.

Lehman College

English Composition I
Course Number: ENG 111
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

FFocus on all aspects of reading and writing, with particular attention to summary, critical responses to short texts, argumentative development in paragraphs and essays, and the rewriting process. Emphasis on organization, language, accuracy, grammar, and mechanics. Classroom instruction supplemented by individual conferences on drafts with instructor, library resources sessions, and appropriate use of available technology.

Lehman College

English Composition II
Course Number: ENG 121
Spring | 3 credits

Focus on all aspects of reading and writing, with particular attention to summary, critical responses to short texts, argumentative development in paragraphs and essays, and the rewriting process. Emphasis on organization, language, accuracy, grammar, and mechanics. Classroom instruction supplemented by individual conferences on drafts with instructor, library resources sessions, and appropriate use of available technology.

Lehman College

Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction, Poetry, and Playwriting
Course Number: ENW 210
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Reading, writing and analyzing contemporary short fiction, poetry, and play writing, focusing on elements pertinent to each form.

Lehman College

Introduction to Digital Imaging
Course Number: ART 112
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the creation of art and imagery using computers and digital media. Production of a portfolio of images for presentation. Students need no previous computer experience.

Lehman College

Introduction to Multilingual Media
Course Number: JRN 111
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to print and electronic multilingual media in the United States. Focus on the growth and diversity of ethnic media, the role they play in the lives of those who use them, and how they compare to mainstream media.

Medgar Evers College

College English I
Course Number: ENGL 112
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This composition course emphasizes the various types of critical and expository writing students will need in the content area courses they will take throughout their college careers. Students will improve their writing skills through the writing and revision of weekly essays and through an in-depth focus on grammar and usage. Students are introduced to elements of literary criticism in poetry, drama, and fiction's will include fiction and non fiction from a variety of cultures and in at least two genres.

Medgar Evers College

Introduction to the World Art
Course Number: ART 100
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

The course traces the artistic and philosophical aspects of World Art as they relate to selected cultural periods from Ancient African Art, the Italian Renaissance, French Impressionism, 20th Century Modernism, and African American Art.

New York City College of Technology

English Composition I
Course Number: ENG 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A course in effective essay writing and basic research techniques, including use of the library. College-level readings are assigned for classroom discussion and essay writing.

New York City College of Technology

Introduction to Paralegal Studies
Course Number: LAW 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An overview of the legal system and the role of the legal assistant within that system. Includes the sources of the law; legal terminology; the operation of the court system at the state and federal level; respective roles of attorney, client and paralegal; legal ethics and the Code of Professional Responsibility, interviewing techniques and a survey of specialized areas of law.

New York City College of Technology

Perspectives in Hospitality Management
Course Number: HMGT 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An overview of the history, likely directions and organizational structure of the hospitality industry and its role in local, national and global economies. Students are introduced to the nature and scope of the hospitality industry, basic terminology, management concepts, career path explorations and the department’s mission and culture.

New York City College of Technology

Public Speaking
Course Number: COM 1330
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Fundamental principles of speaking in public situations and the preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive presentations. Subjects include ethics in public speaking, audience analysis, selecting and researching speech topics, constructing well-reasoned arguments, extemporaneous delivery, and peer evaluation. Students are expected to develop outlines and speaking notes, use visual aids, and improve on verbal and nonverbal delivery skills.

Queensborough Community College

Acting I
Course Number: TH 120
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Theory and practice of the art of acting; exercises in sense impression; characterization; improvisations; scenes from plays; special reports. Designed for the development of a knowledgeable and appreciative audience as well as for basic acting techniques.

Queensborough Community College

English Composition I
Course Number: EN 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Development of a process for producing intelligent essays that are clearly and effectively written; library work; 6,000 words of writing, both in formal themes written for evaluation and in informal writing such as the keeping of a journal. During the recitation hour, students review grammar and syntax, sentence structure, paragraph development and organization, and the formulation of thesis statements.

Queensborough Community College

English Composition II: Introduction to Literature
Course Number: EN 102
3 credits

Continued practice in writing combined with an introduction to literature: fiction, drama, and poetry. During the recitation hour, students review basic elements of writing and analytical and critical reading skills and research strategies.

Queensborough Community College

Immigration and Ethnic Groups in American History
Course Number: HI 125
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Analyzes the American immigration experience and examines various ethnic groups that came to America; depicts their pre-immigration background and the historical causes of immigration; evaluates the impact of the immigrants on American history and of America upon the immigrants. Among themes to be examined are the historical development of the ghetto and American reception of immigrants.

Queens College

College Writing
Course Number: ENGL 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The arts and practices of effective writing and reading in college, especially the use of language to discover ideas. Methods of research and documentation will be taught, along with some introduction to rhetorical purposes and strategies.

Queens College

Introduction to Acting
Course Number: DRAMA 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduces all aspects of acting, including philosophy and different methods; physical, sensory, and emotional work; improvisations; theatre games; monologues; character analysis; scene study; script interpretation; performing and working relationship with director.

Queens College

Introduction to Language
Course Number: LCD 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A survey of the study of language: Structure, language and society, first and second language acquisition, and other related topics.

Queens College

Introduction to Philosophy
Course Number: PHIL 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Basic problems such as knowledge, reality, meaning, value, the nature of persons and their political and cultural environment are introduced through selected readings of great philosophers.

York College

Basic Acting
Course Number: TA 211
Spring | 3 credits

The elements of acting; physical and vocal relaxation and concentration; sense memory and emotional recall; prepared scenes and improvisations.

York College

Elementary Spanish II
Course Number: SPAN 102
Spring | 3 credits

Continuation of the beginner's course; more complex grammatical structures; integrated reading and further practice in conversation.

York College

Intermediate Spanish I
Course Number: SPAN 105
Spring | 3 credits

Intensive oral-aural practice based on selected readings; functional review of grammar. Separate sections of this course are given for native and non-native speakers of Spanish in order to best serve the students needs. Placement in the proper section is determined by the discipline.

York College

Introduction to Multicultural Studies
Course Number: CLDV 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A study of what culture is; how it influences the choices we make; how to deal positively with conflicts that inevitably arise in working/living situations with people of diverse cultures. It is a course structured to raise multicultural awareness and fortify students' social skills in dealing with cultural differences. It includes ethnographic study of cultural groups in the U.S.A. Through the study of cultural concepts, this course develops skills in critical thinking, writing and scholarly documentation.

York College

Introduction to the Theatre
Course Number: TA 110
Fall | 3 credits

Theatrical theory in historical context beginning with the Greeks. Including written play analysis and the application of this analysis to concepts of lighting, costuming, scene design, and performance.

York College

Jazz Improvisation I
Course Number: MUS 146
3 credits

York College

Jazz Improvisation II
Course Number: MUS 246
3 credits

York College

Jazz Workshop I
Course Number: MUS 139
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Performance of contemporary jazz-rock compositions; the study of ensemble and solo techniques. Students employ jazz improvisation principles with voices and instruments and are introduced to the synthesizer as used in jazz performance.

York College

Jazz Workshop II
Course Number: MUS 239
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Performance of contemporary jazz-rock compositions; the study of ensemble and solo techniques. Students employ jazz improvisation principles with voices and instruments and are introduced to the synthesizer as used in jazz performance.

York College

Jazz Workshop III
Course Number: MUS 339
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Performance of contemporary jazz-rock compositions; the study of ensemble and solo techniques. Students employ jazz improvisation principles with voices and instruments and are introduced to the synthesizer as used in jazz performance.

York College

Jazz Workshop IV
Course Number: MUS 439
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Performance of contemporary jazz-rock compositions; the study of ensemble and solo techniques. Students employ jazz improvisation principles with voices and instruments and are introduced to the synthesizer as used in jazz performance.

York College

Rapid Review of Basic Spanish
Course Number: SPAN 104
Fall | 3 credits

A refresher course of basic Spanish grammar and reading integrating the use of tapes and laboratory materials. Designed for students who wish to reinforce their basic knowledge of the language and for native speakers who have not studied Spanish syntax.

York College

Visual Design - Color
Course Number: FA 151
3 credits

Asians in the U.S. LEC
Course Number: ASIAN 21000
0 credits

College Composition I
Course Number: ENG 101
3 credits

Criminal Law and Investigation Workshop
Course Number: CNW_SOCS
0 credits

Criminal Law and Investigation Worksop
Course Number:
0 credits

Elementary German 2 LEC
Course Number: GERMN 10200
0 credits

Elementary German II
Course Number: GERMN 1020
0 credits

General Psychology I
Course Number: PSY 101
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Human Development
Course Number: PSYCH 150
3 credits

Intermediate German 2 LEC
Course Number: GERMN 20200
0 credits

Intermediate German II
Course Number: GERMN 2020
0 credits

Introduction to Drawing
Course Number: ART 111
3 credits

Introduction to Human Evolution
Course Number: ANTHP 10100
0 credits

Introduction to Media Studies LEC
Course Number: MEDIA 18000
0 credits

Nature of Religion
Course Number: REL 11000
0 credits

Piano LEC
Course Number: MUS 120
3 credits

Principles of Epidemiology
Course Number: COMHE 330
0 credits

Psychology of Human Sexuality
Course Number: PSYCH 17000
0 credits

Tectonic Theater Project
Course Number: THEA 25355
0 credits

Business Classes
CollegeCourse
Baruch College

Introduction to Business
Course Number: BUS 1000
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Business 1000 gives students an overview of the study of business early in their college studies so that they can decide which field to major in and how the world of business works. The class is broken in four distinct parts--finance, marketing, management and an introductory section that covers ethics, global business and economics. Each of these parts covers the basic concepts found in one of the areas a student might select as a major. Each section also covers the current issues in today's business world. These are the kinds of topics likely to be encountered in the current business press. Lectures and recitation sections are both supplemented with real-world case histories designed to highlight a specfic topical, and often controversial, issue. In the recitation sections, students write about, debate and otherwise present their ideas on each of the current issue topics covered in the large lectures.

Baruch College

Personal Finance
Course Number: FIN 1601
Fall | 3 credits

Discusses the problems involved in efficient handling of personal finance and consumption expenditure, including consumer protection, taxation, insurance, home financing, and methods of borrowing and investing money.

Baruch College

Principles of Finance (Open to Academy of Finance students only)
Course Number: FIN 3000
3 credits

This course provides students with a rigorous introduction to the fundamental principles of finance. The primary concepts covered include the time value of money, principles of valuation and risk, and the nature and characteristics of domestic and international financial securities and markets. Specific applications include the valuation of debt and equity securities and capital budgeting analysis.

Bronx Community College

Introduction to Business
Course Number: BUS 10
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introductory survey course to acquaint students with business as a field of study. Analysis of the role of business in society with emphasis on how the business system operates. Functional areas of accounting, marketing, finance, business law, management and information systems.

College of Staten Island

Introduction to Economics
Course Number: ECO 101
Fall | 3 credits

This course examines the principles of economics in the context of the operation of the United States economy. Both microeconomic theory (behavior of firms and households) and macroeconomic theory (total output, inflation, employment and unemployment, economic growth) will be introduced as will economic approaches to social problems.

College of Staten Island

Marketing
Course Number: MKT 111
Spring | 3 credits

Survey of the nature of the United States distributive system, covering the principles, policies, and practices used by manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers. Emphasis is placed on the planning, development, and efficient use of marketing tools and institutions in the creation and expansion of markets. Current trends and developments in modern marketing practice are analyzed.

College of Staten Island

Organizational Theory and Management
Course Number: MGT 110
Spring | 3 credits

The course introduces key management functions including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. It also provides introduction to management concepts including organizational structure, culture, decision making, leadership, motivation, and groups and teams.

Hostos Community College

Introduction to Business
Course Number: BUS 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The student will discuss and analyze problems relating to financing and operating a business, and will demonstrate knowledge of the functions of a business including items, such as human resources and market management. The student will explain the principles of business management, such as planning, staffing, organizing, directing, and decision making. The student will participate in individual and group written analysis and oral presentation of cases. The student will also apply analytical thinking by solving business problems using microcomputers in a laboratory setting.

Hunter College

Introduction to Economics
Course Number: ECO 100
Spring | 3 credits

Basic economic concepts and thought; issues and policy.

Kingsborough Community College

Business Administration: Introduction to Business
Course Number: BA 10
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The dynamic world of the business environment. Included are: the business organization, from the sole proprietor (entrepreneur) to the corporate entity; four functions of management (planning, organizing, leading and controlling); four elements of the marketing mix (product, price, promotion and distribution). Practical applications of management and marketing skills in small business, and in large corporations, the profit motive as a key feature in the American free enterprise system, legal aspects of operating a business, and the role of computers in business.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Computer Concepts
Course Number: BA 60
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Lab-oriented course introduces microcomputer hardware and software, emphasizing the "Big Four" business applications: word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, and presentation graphics. Conceptual and operational skills necessary to successfully compete in the modern technological business environment.

LaGuardia Community College

Introduction to Business
Course Number: BTM 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the role of business in our economy, the forms of organization, and the various business functions such as management, personnel, marketing and finance. Career opportunities in the business world are also explored.

LaGuardia Community College

Introduction to Computer Information Systems and Technologies
Course Number: BTC 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course will help students develop an understanding of computers through the exploration of software packages. The applications include word processing, spreadsheet, presentation graphics and database management. Students will learn computer terminologies and also explore developments in related technologies. Topics covered will include web design and the use of current Internet resources.

LaGuardia Community College

Principles of Accounting I
Course Number: BTA 111
Fall | 4 credits

This course introduces students to the accounting cycle. The course reviews the fundamental concepts and techniques of recording transactions in journals, summarizing the transactions, using adjusting and closing procedures, and preparing financial statements and reports. It also introduces the student to valuation accounting relating to inventory and fixed assets, internal control concepts with an emphasis on cash control, procedures for notes payable and receivable, and payroll accounting

Medgar Evers College

Introduction to Criminal Law
Course Number: PA 150
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course is specifically designed to provide students with a basic understanding of criminal law and the criminal justice system. It will include the history, theory, and practice of the substantive criminal law, the sources of law, legislative purpose and responsibilities, the major elements of statutory offenses and their application in the Criminal Justice Process.

New York City College of Technology

Essentials of Marketing
Course Number: MKT 1100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Functions involved in distributing goods, the role of the manufacturer in selecting target markets, types of marketing institutions (wholesale and retail). Formulating marketing policies and strategies. The role of government and the effects of consumerism on marketing practices.

New York City College of Technology

Perspectives in Hospitality Management
Course Number: HGMT 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An overview of the history, likely directions and organizational structure of the hospitality industry and its role in local, national and global economies. Students are introduced to the nature and scope of the hospitality industry, basic terminology, management concepts, career path explorations and the department’s mission and culture.

Queensborough Community College

Business Organization and Management
Course Number: BU 201
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Structure and character of modern business; business and its relationship to other social organizations; how businesses are organized and managed; human factors in business and industry; management and the decision-making process; planning, organizing, programming, and controlling processes; production, financing, and marketing considerations in operation of business enterprises.

Corporate Finance LEC
Course Number: ECO 36500
0 credits

Eco Statistics LEC
Course Number: ECO 22100
0 credits

Intermediate Microeconomics LEC
Course Number: ECO 30000
0 credits

Introduction to Economics
Course Number: ECO 100
Spring | 0 credits

Perspectives in Hospitality Management
Course Number:
0 credits

An overview of the history, likely directions and organizational structure of the hospitality industry and its role in local, national and global economies. Students are introduced to the nature and scope of the hospitality industry, basic terminology, management concepts, career path explorations and the department’s mission and culture.

College 101 Classes
CollegeCourse
Bronx Community College

First-Year Seminar
Course Number: FYS 11
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

This course combines a practical introduction to college for first-semester students with an introduction to academic study. Students complete an integrated curriculum combining college readiness activities and assignments, frequent computer lab activities, and introductory-level study of selected topics drawn from across the disciplines. College readiness subjects include time management, communication strategies, utilizing online resources, study skills, stress management and goal setting, both academic and professional.

Kingsborough Community College

Career and Life Planning
Course Number: SD 11
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

Students have an opportunity to explore careers in relation to their interests, abilities, aptitudes and their college experiences. They learn how to plan for future work and leisure time. Topics include: the nature of work; contemporary changes in careers and work ethic; self assessment; jobs and changing life styles. Current labor market information is introduced followed by intensive, individual research and exploration of occupations. Instruction and practical assignments explore the dynamics and techniques of job-seeking; decision-making; goal-planning and priority-setting.

Kingsborough Community College

Freshman Year Experience
Course Number: SD 10
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

Student Development (SD 10) is a one-credit Freshman Seminar course. The course facilitates, interactive learning for students, provides information and skills important for transition to and success in college. In order to provide students with an opportunity to develop personally, academically, and socially, the course is divided into several components which include: academic policies, career exploration, human relations, learning styles, library skills, and the advisement/registration process. Students are encouraged to think critically as well as develop an academic and life plan. The class promotes the development of a strong bond between the students and their instructor as well as with the college community.

Medgar Evers College

Freshman Seminar I
Course Number: FS 101
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

This designed to provide first-time college students, and first and second semester Re-Admit students with the necessary skills required for a successful college experience. Five interdisciplinary modules will be presented: Bonding, Orientation, Study/Library Skills, Wellness, and Education/Careers. Skills will include study habits, listening, note/test taking, library and research techniques, college/life management, and student rights and responsibilities as they relate to Medgar Evers, the institution, mission, organization and function of its offices. Library Research/Study Skills will be reinforced throughout the curriculum.

York College

Fundamentals of Financial Planning and Wealth Management
Course Number: FINC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course examines the foundations of financial planning & wealth management. Topics include: time value of money, investment options (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, commodities), budgeting, cash-flow management, credit leveraging, retirement planning, estate planning, tax planning, higher education planning and health care planning.

York College

Practicum in Learning Techniques and Problem-Solving
Course Number: SD 103
Spring | 1 credit

Supervised experience in the application of various learning strategies and techniques.

College Now Workshop - English
Course Number: CNW_ENG
0 credits

Criminal Law and Investigation Worksop
Course Number: CNW_SOCS
0 credits

Communications Classes
CollegeCourse
Baruch College

Speech Communication
Course Number: COM 1010
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course provides training and practice in the preparation and delivery of original speeches, encourages the use of clear language, develops students' awareness of intellectual and ethical aspects of communication, and promotes critical thinking and academic research.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Fundamentals of Speech
Course Number: SPE 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The aim of this course is to develop effective skills in speech communication. The student examines how to generate topics and organize ideas, masters elements of audience psychology, and practices techniques of speech presentation in a public forum. All elements of speech production and presentation are considered.

Brooklyn College

Introduction to Mass Media
Course Number: TVR 6.5
Spring | 3 credits

Survey of the history, industry practices, and controversies involved in the media of mass communication. Mainstream mass media of books, newspapers, magazines, film, radio, recordings, television, and the Internet. Analysis of news, entertainment, advertising, and public strategies, as well as media impact, legal issues, and ethics.

College of Staten Island

Introduction to Media
Course Number: COM 100
Fall | 3 credits

An introduction to television, radio, and related media.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Broadcasting
Course Number: MCB 35
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Historical development, social philosophy and technology of radio and television, investigation of ratings, program production and scheduling.

Kingsborough Community College

Mass Communications
Course Number: COM 11
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The study of mass communications and their effects on society and interpersonal communication through both historical and contemporary views. Communications systems, including print, film, and electronic media, will be considered with an emphasis on relevant speaking skills.

LaGuardia Community College

Literacy and Propaganda
Course Number: CSE 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course introduces students to methods of understanding a highly developed and pervasive discourse: propaganda. Emphasis is placed on reading materials that use the persuasive and argumentative language of politics, advertising, cultural discussions and the media. Political speeches, essays, editorials, and articles are used to enlarge the student's experience with the materials and tools of propaganda. The student will acquire the intellectual framework and sophisticated level of literacy needed to recognize and respond to the aims of propaganda.

LaGuardia Community College

Reading the Biography
Course Number: CSE 120
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course will introduce students to the critical reading and evaluation of biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, diaries and journals. The aims of the course will be to: evaluate claims to truth and truthful recollections; examine historical claims through first person accounts; develop awareness of the methods and techniques of biographical and autobiographical writing; understand the uses of biographical writing and its place in society; explore biographies and autobiographies as vehicles for the creation of the self. The student will become proficient and develop a deeper appreciation of biographical narratives and their uses in self-understanding.

Queensborough Community College

Oral Performance for the Actor and Speaker
Course Number: SP 321
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Techniques of reading aloud from plays, poetry, prose, and essay. Practice in conveying information, projecting ideas, creating emotions, and interpreting from the script and oral interpretation as a means of developing literary criticism and discrimination.

Queensborough Community College

Speech Communications
Course Number: SP 211
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Study of oral communication and its role in contemporary society. Emphasis on listening, interpersonal communication, small group decision-making, and public speaking.

Computer Science & Engineering Classes
CollegeCourse
Bronx Community College

Computer Applications in Technology
Course Number: ELC 15
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Introductory course in basic computer orientation and implementation of hardware and software applications in technology. Students will use various software packages to create documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases and presentations. Students will utilize this knowledge to solve problems and transfer information via electronic media. Lectures, interactive learning and demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Computer Programming I
Course Number: CSC 110
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course introduces the student to the theoretical and practical aspects of computers. The major laboratory experience is the completion of programming projects using Polya's four-step method. These projects have been carefully selected and ordered to provide the student with experience in fundamental control and data structures.

Hostos Community College

Introduction to the Digital Toolbox
Course Number: DD 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course provides students with a foundational understanding of the essential software for beginning their careers as digital designers. These will include the Adobe Creative Suite software (Photoshop, Illustrator, ImageReady, & InDesign), Apple’s iMovie, Garageband, and KeyNote as well as Microsoft’s Power Point. The class will provide an overview of the various interface elements and program capabilities through a variety of engaging design projects.

Hunter College

Introduction to Computer Science
Course Number: CSCI 127
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course presents an overview of computer science (CS) with an emphasis on problem-solving and computational thinking through ‘coding’: computer programming for beginners. Other topics include: organization of hardware, software, and how information is structured on contemporary computing devices. This course is pre-requisite to several introductory core courses in the CS Major.

Lehman College

Computer Information Systems
Course Number: CIS 211
Spring | 4 credits

Survey of the technology and applications of computer- based information systems in business.

Lehman College

Programming Methods I
Course Number: CMP 167
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Structured computer programming using a modern high-level programming language. Includes console I/O, data types, variables, control structures, including iteration, arrays, function definitions and calls, parameter passing, functional decomposition, and an introduction to objects. Debugging techniques.

Medgar Evers College

Internet And Web Technologies
Course Number: CS 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course provided students with practical knowledge about computer hardware and software, and a basic understanding of the underlying communication technology of the Internet. Students learn how to navigate and search the Internet, while exploring numerous research-related web sites using E-mail, FTP, WAIS, and Telnet services. After exploring and using HTML to create Web pages, JavaScript is introduced and used for developing client-side applications for Web browsers. A publishable home page or other Web document is produced by students as their final course project.

Queensborough Community College

Computers in Modern Society
Course Number: ET 821
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course examines the impact of computers on modern life by looking at how they work, what they do, where they can be used, what they are capable of, what happens when they fail and how they are used and misused. Among the many topics included are gaming, entertainment, communications and social networking, encryption, and cryptography, data security, piracy, and copyright, governmental regulation and related issues, Class demonstrations are used to illustrate major points.

York College

Computer Science I
Course Number: CS 172
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to computer science with a strong emphasis on a systematic approach to problem solving; core principles of programming will be introduced and illustrated through examples in a high level programming language such as C++; applications in natural and social sciences, and finance.

York College

Introduction to Microcomputers I
Course Number: AC 101
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

Hands-on introduction to the components and operation of microcomputers. The students understanding of computer principles, procedures, and terminology will be developed through lab projects using software appropriate to composition and report preparation in the arts and sciences.

Analysis & Design 1 LEC
Course Number: CSCI 13500
0 credits

Practical Unix Programming
Course Number: CSCI 13200
0 credits

Supervised Program LAB
Course Number: CSCI 13600
0 credits

Health Classes
CollegeCourse
Borough of Manhattan Community College

Comprehensive Health Education
Course Number: HED 110
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course in health educations offers a comprehensive approach that provides students with the knowledge, skills, and behavioral models to enhance their physical, emotional, social, intellectual and spiritual health as well as facilitate their health decision-making ability. Areas of specialization include: alcohol, tobacco and abused substances, mental and emotional health, human sexuality and family living, nutrition, physical fitness, cardiovascular health, environmental health and health care delivery.

Brooklyn College

Fundamentals of Nutrition
Course Number: H&NTR 25.1
Spring | 3 credits

Fundamental principles of nutrition as they relate to optimum health of the individual and the family. Social, economic, and educational implications. Evaluation of various mass media relating to the field.

Brooklyn College

Personal and Community Health
Course Number: H&NTR 6.1
Fall | 3 credits

Basic health concepts. Personal responsibility for health maintenance and improvement for individuals, families, and communities.

Hostos Community College

Introduction to Community Health
Course Number: HLT 110
Spring | 3 credits

The student will examine and analyze various health organizations and their role in community health; the emerging role of community health workers in promoting health of neglected populations; the spread and control of communicable diseases; the community health structure and the principles underlying health behavior, learning, and change; theories of health behavior and practical models for community health worker interventions.

Hostos Community College

Medical Terminology
Course Number: HLT 124
Fall | 3 credits

This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of medical word building and in developing an extensive medical vocabulary. The language of medicine will be enriched by using the body systems approach in an experiential context of the contemporary health care setting, as well as the art of critical thinking.

Hunter College

Principles of Epidemiology
Course Number: COMHE 330
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Methods of study of disease; risk factors; distribution, causes, prevention, and control of selected diseases.

Queensborough Community College

Critical Issues in Health Education
Course Number: HE 102
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

A concentrated course of study involving research and discussion of critical health issues dealing with mental health, addictions and dependencies, exercise, diet, human sexuality, major diseases and their relation to morbidity and longevity.

Queens College

Fitness through Diet, Exercise, and Weight Control
Course Number: FNES 30
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Current concepts and principles of nutrition, energy balance, body composition, weight control, and obesity, and physiological basis of physical conditioning. Opportunity for practical experience in managing diet and exercise programs.

York College

Basic Concepts of Health Professions
Course Number: HPGC 101
Fall, Spring | 2 credits

Basic concepts of health and disease; background health determinants; infections and chronic diseases; maternal and child health; geriatrics; social and physical environments.

York College

Nutrition and Health
Course Number: HE 314
Spring | 3 credits

The relationship of foods and nutrition to personal health and health problems, such as weight control.

Mathematics & Statistics Classes
CollegeCourse
Baruch College

Calculus I (Open to Baruch College HS students only)
Course Number: MTH 2610
Spring | 4 credits

Topics to be discussed include functions, inequalities, limits, derivatives of functions, applications to geometry and elementary economic analysis, theory of maxima and minima, antiderivatives, integration of functions, applications to geometry, and fundamental theorem of calculus.

Bronx Community College

Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Course Number: MTH 30
Spring | 3 credits

Topics include inequalities, function concept, special functions, exponential and logarithmic function, rational and irrational functions, binomial theorem, trigonometric functions, mathematical induction.

Bronx Community College

Probability and Statistics
Course Number: MTH 23
3 credits

Topics selected from permutations, combinations, probability, sets, finite sample spaces, probabilities as areas, basic statistical concepts, the normal distribution, central limit theorem.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Introduction to Statistics
Course Number: MAT 150
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course covers basic statistics, including: measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, graphs, correlation, the regression line, confidence intervals, the significance of differences, and hypothesis testing, including z-tests, t-tests, and chi-square tests.

College of Staten Island

Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Course Number: MTH 113
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal curve, hypothesis testing. Linear correlation and regression, basic concepts in probability with application to problems in the social, behavioral, and biological sciences. Statistical computer programs will be used extensively.

Hunter College

Mathematics and Everyday Life
Course Number: MATH 102
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Students will learn how to model real world problems with mathematics, and learn techniques for solving them. Topics include personal finance, statistical reasoning, probability, exponential growth, and voting theory.

Kingsborough Community College

Elementary Algebra
Course Number: MATH 1
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Designed to help students pass the Mathematics A High School Regents Exam. Topics include: number concepts, algebraic reasoning, introductory geometry, the coordinate plane and probability.

Kingsborough Community College

Elements of Statistics
Course Number: MATH 20
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to probability and statistics including: tabulation and graphing of distributions, central and dispersion tendencies, comparison techniques, correlations and predictive techniques. Instruction and practice in the use of desk calculators and the basic language.

Kingsborough Community College

Intermediate Algebra
Course Number: MATH 3
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Designed to help students pass the Mathematics B High School Regents Exam. Inequalities, rational expressions, exponents, quadratic equations, radicals, complex numbers, functions, logarithms and exponential functions.

LaGuardia Community College

College Algebra and Trigonometry
Course Number: MAT 115
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course will start with a review of basic algebra (factoring, solving linear equations and equalities, etc.) and proceed to a study of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. These functions will be used in applications involving simple mathematical modeling where students will engage in inquiry activities aimed at improving critical-thinking skills.

LaGuardia Community College

Elementary Statistics I
Course Number: MAT 120
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course serves as a study of fundamental concepts and computational techniques of elementary statistics. Among the topics studied are: measures of central tendency, standard deviation, percentiles, statistical graphs, binomial and normal distributions, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation. A statistical software package will be used by students to obtain basic sample statistics, to simulate fundamental theorems and to assist with hypothesis testing. A graphing calculator will be used by students to assist with computations, as well as with tabular and graphical displays of data.

LaGuardia Community College

Mathematics and the Modern World
Course Number: MAT 107
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course introduces selected topics in mathematics which have significant application in other fields. For each topic studied, emphasis will be placed first on the mathematics itself, and then on one or more significant applications of the mathematics. Topics to be included will be chosen from the areas of number theory, algebra, probability and statistics, topology, computers, and geometry.

LaGuardia Community College

Precalculus
Course Number: MAT 200
Spring | 4 credits

This course is intended as a preparation for the study of calculus. Functions and their graphs will be analyzed theoretically within a framework that emphasizes their appearance in applied settings. Particular attention will be placed on polynomical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric models. The use of graphing utilities as analytical tools will be emphasized. Each student is required to have a graphing calculator.

Lehman College

Precalculus
Course Number: MAT 172
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions with applications to problems in mathematics and the sciences.

New York City College of Technology

Calculus I
Course Number: MAT 1475
Spring | 4 credits

Topics include functions, limits, differentiation, tangent lines, Rolle's Theorem, the Mean Value Theorem, integration, and applications.

New York City College of Technology

College Algebra & Trigonometry
Course Number: MAT 1275
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

An intermediate and advanced algebra course. Topics include quadratic equations, the distance and midpoint formula, graphing parabolas and circles, systems of linear and quadratic equations, an introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions. Topics from trigonometry including basic trigonometric functions, identities, equations and solutions of triangles.

New York City College of Technology

Precalculus
Course Number: MAT 1375
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Topics include an in-depth study of functions such as polynomial functions, inverse functions, radical functions, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions; solving inequalities; elements of vectors and complex numbers; solving trigonometric equations and identities involving sum, double and half-angle formulas; Binomial Theorem; and progressions. A graphing calculator is required.

Queensborough Community College

College Algebra
Course Number: MA 119
Fall | 3 credits

A basic presentation of the fundamental concepts of college algebra, systems of linear equations, inequalities, linear, quadratic exponential and logarithmic functions.

Queens College

Precalculus
Course Number: MATH 122
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course offers a thorough introduction to the topics required for calculus. Topics include: real and complex numbers, algebra of functions, the fundamental theorem of algebra, trigonometry, logarithms and exponential functions, conic sections, and the use of graphic calculators.

York College

Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Course Number: MATH 121
Fall | 4 credits

An introduction to calculus and analytic geometry; emphasis on theory as well as techniques and applications; functions, limits, differentiation, integration; applications; lines, conic sections, and graph sketching. This is a full year class.

York College

Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Course Number: MATH 111
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Elements of statistics, graphs, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion; elementary probability theory, counting, binomial and normal distributions.

York College

Pre-Calculus
Course Number: MATH 120
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Advanced topics in algebra, functions and graphs, inverse functions, composite functions, polynomial and rational functions, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions. This is a full year class.

Elementary Probability and Statistics
Course Number: STAT 113
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Science Classes
CollegeCourse
City College of New York

Biology: The Strategy of Life
Course Number: BIO 10000
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The basic properties of living systems with emphasis on human beings as functioning biological entities.

City College of New York

Physcis
Course Number: PHYS 10000
Spring | 3 credits

1. How nature works the interplay of space, time, matter and energy; 2. Structures are born, live out their life cycles, and die. These include us, the stars, and perhaps the universe. This theme may be called the scientific story of genesis.

College of Staten Island

Galatic Laboratory
Course Number: AST 103
Fall | 1 credit

Experiments on atomic properties of matter, stellar atmosphere, variable and novastars, galaxy classification, stellar clusters, and observation work. Corequisite: AST 102

College of Staten Island

Principles of Biology I
Course Number: BIO 106
Spring | 3 credits

Introductory biology for non-science majors. Structure and function of the body and the effects of the environment on it. Fundamental biological principles and concepts and their applications to relevant concerns such as drug addiction, food additives, physical fitness, and the population explosion. Not credited toward the Biology major.

College of Staten Island

Principles of Biology I Laboratory
Course Number: BIO 107
Spring | 2 credits

Laboratory experiences illustrating principles and topics discussed in BIO 106

College of Staten Island

Theories of the Universe
Course Number: AST 102
Fall | 3 credits

A presentation of the galaxy, atomic structure, star populations, nuclear energy, stellar evolution, galactic structure, and the universe.

Hostos Community College

Anatomy & Physiology I
Course Number: BIO 230
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

Students will demonstrate a knowledge of basic chemistry, body fluids, and the structure and function of the cell. Students will also list and describe the four kinds of animal tissue; list major bones and their function; and describe structure and function of the muscular and circulatory systems. 3-hrs. lecture/3-hrs. lab

Hunter College

Nutrition
Course Number: NSF 141
Fall | 3 credits

Fundamentals of the science of nutrition as they apply to individuals and society.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Diesel Engines
Course Number: MT 51
2 credits

The principles of the diesel engine operation, construction, testing and maintenance are covered. Troubleshooting and the emergency repairs of these engines as well as the differences between two cycle and four cycle diesel are reviewed.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Maritime Technology
Course Number: MT 30
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to seamanship, including Maritime career opportunities and required training, nautical terminology, boating laws and regulations and types of engines.

Kingsborough Community College

Issues and Adventures in Science
Course Number: SCI 1
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The most recent and important discoveries in the biological and physical sciences are presented, observed, discussed, and experimented with, to acquaint students with the world around them. Brain research, studies of aging, disease, fertility, immunity, and the origin of life are explored. Studies emphasize relations to mankind's place in the universe, self-explorations and technological achievements.

LaGuardia Community College

Topics in Physics
Course Number: SCP 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This survey course for nonscience majors covers major concepts in physics. Subjects included are Newtonian mechanics, conservation of energy, atomic theory, electrostatics and electricity, wave motion, light, and modern physics. Although mathematical formulas are used when necessary the emphasis is on understanding the concepts. Principles studied are applied to analyze and understand topics ranging from energy conservation and global warming to photocells and optical fibers. Practical exercises are included.

LaGuardia Community College

Topics in Astronomy
Course Number: SCP 140
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course surveys modern astronomy with special emphasis on recent developments in space and astrophysics. Among the topics to be covered will be planetary astronomy and geology, the moon, the possibility of life on other worlds, energy production in stars, stella evolution, pulsars, quasars, "black holes," and cosmology. Laboratory periods will include field trips to planetariums and observatories in the N.Y.C. area.

Medgar Evers College

Introduction to the Science of Biology
Course Number: BIO 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introductory course intended to acquaint students with the nature and purpose of science, modern biological concepts of life, and the knowledge and importance of the interactions among themselves, other living organisms on the planet, and the environment. A laboratory experience will be an integral component. The laboratory is intended to augment the lecture by means of demonstrations and hands - on experiments. Visits to scientific museums and centers are required.

Queensborough Community College

Earth Science
Course Number: GE 125
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Origin of our solar system; structure and composition of our home planet, earth; origin of earth's landscapes and oceans; patterns of weather and climate.

Queensborough Community College

Plants and People
Course Number: BI 170
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Plant forms and functions including plant evolution, ecology, heredity and diseases; plants in history, folklore, agriculture, horticulture, and industry, plant drugs and poison.

Queensborough Community College

Science and Technology in Modern Life
Course Number: ET 880
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Basic scientific principles that underlie and enable the conveniences and necessities we take fro granted in our modern society will be introduced and studied. The science and technology underlying the electrical grid, power generation, automobile, aircraft, television, cell phones, solid state electronics, cat scans, MRI, molecular medicine, DNA, fission and fusion, LED lighting, photovoltaics, nano-materials, stem cells, heat pumps, fuel cells, artificial intelligence, robotics, GPS, Wi-Fi, Internet, sonar, radar, microprocessor and the PC.

Queensborough Community College

Space, Astronomy and Our Universe
Course Number: PH 111
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

"Space, Astronomy, and our Universe” discusses topics related to space and astronomy, beginning with our planet and our Moon, and extending to stars, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. This course will explore physical processes and laws that govern the motion and evolution of all objects in the Universe, including meteors, asteroids, planets, and stars.

Queens College

General Psychology
Course Number: PSYCH 101
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

An introduction to the chief facts, principles, methods, and theories of psychology. Topics discussed include the history of psychology, sensory and perceptual processes, motivation and emotion, behavior development, learning and cognition, psychometrics, personality, psychopathology, and social behavior. This course requires a research experience of up to 5 hours. This experience can consist of participation in research studies or short written reports of published psychological research.

York College

Principles of Inheritance and Human Reproduction
Course Number: BIO 120
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to the genetics and chemistry of biological macromolecules, including DNA, RNA, and enzymes, and an examination of their role in life processes. Genetics and biology of sexual reproduction; embryonic growth and development.

Basic Concepts:Physics LEC
Course Number: PHYS 10000
3 credits

World Regional Geog LEC
Course Number: GEOG 15000
0 credits

Social Sciences Classes
CollegeCourse
Baruch College

Fundamentals of Business Law
Course Number: LAW 1101
Spring | 3 credits

This course provides an understanding of the nature of law and its role in business. The law of business contracts will be examined in depth. Other topics include tort liability, employment law, and bankruptcy. The course requires case analysis, problem solving, development of critical thinking skills, and oral and written communication.

Baruch College

General Psychology
Course Number: PSY 1001
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

This course introduces students to the scientific study of human behavior. It covers the basic psychological processes of thinking, motivation, perception, learning, and the significance of the brain in mediating these processes. It examines the normal personality, how it develops and how it functions in a social context. Psychological disorders are also discussed. Students select from the following: three hours of participation as subjects in approved psychological research; participation in a library research workshop on psychological topics; or preparation of a proposal for a simple experiment.

Baruch College

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Course Number: ANT 1001
3 credits

Historical development of cultural anthropology; major concepts and perspectives as illustrated in the work of leading figures in the field. Various problems will be examined in the context of materials from selected cultures around the world. Recent trends will be examined, including the relations between culture and language.

Baruch College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 1005
Spring | 3 credits

This course is a survey of sociological perspectives-particularly social interactionism, functionalism, and conflict theory. It focuses on the role of culture in shaping behavior patterns; key social institutions, such as the family, work, and religion; and the ways that globalization and multiculturalism are altering contemporary social life.

Bronx Community College

American National Government
Course Number: POL 11
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Survey of structure and activities of the national government: bases of present political system, pressure groups, political parties, elections, Congress, the President, the Supreme Court, and the protection and deprivation of individual rights.

Bronx Community College

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CRJ 11
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course familiarizes students with the American criminal justice system. The course introduces students to the theories, concepts and ways of measuring crime. It introduces students to the three main institutions of the criminal justice system: the police, the courts and corrections. Emphasis is placed on the criminal justice process and how the various institutions of criminal justice interact.

Bronx Community College

Psychology
Course Number: PSY 11
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Scientific method in the understanding of human behavior. Introductory study of growth and development, motivation, emotions and mental health, learning, intelligence and personality evaluation.

Bronx Community College

Sociology
Course Number: SOC 11
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the scientific study of human life as group life. Culture and personality; courtship, marriage and family; religious behavior; education and communication; theories of social stratification and social change.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

General Psychology
Course Number: PSY 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course stresses adaptive human behavior in relation to the environment. Topics considered include: origins and methods of psychology, neuropsychological bases of behavior, maturation, motivation, emotion, learning frustration, and conflict.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course analyzes the structure, processes and products associated with group living. Attention is focused on the concepts of social organization, culture, groups, stratification, major social institutions, and significant trends in group living.

Brooklyn College

Deviant Behavior
Course Number: SOC 51.3
Spring | 3 credits

Sociological theories of deviant behavior including social causation, labeling, stigmatization. Sexual deviance, suicide, alcoholism, drug abuse, juvenile delinquency, counterculture.

Brooklyn College

Social Problems
Course Number: SOC 51.1
Fall | 3 credits

Problems generated by conflicting demands within the social structure of American society. Discussions and readings about social problems related to crime, work, urban life, race, ethnicity, and business organizations.

City College of New York

Applications of Psychology in the Modern World
Course Number: PSY 10200
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to the study of human development and learning, personality and motivation, sex differences, attitudes, aggressions, interpersonal attraction, behavior in groups and work settings, abnormal behavior and its treatment. Emphasis on the ways in which psychological theory and research can be applied to individual and social problems.

City College of New York

Dominican Heritage
Course Number: LALS 12300
3 credits

A survey of the cultural development of the Dominican Republic from pre-Columbian times to the present. Special consideration will be given to socio-economic and political developments and the relationship that exists between the Dominican Republic and the United States.

City College of New York

Individual, Group and Society: An Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 10500
Spring | 3 credits

The language of sociology, the sociological perspective, and basic areas of sociological inquiry. Topics include: culture, socialization, self and society, social stratification and social class. The family, religion, polity, community organization, collective behavior, mass culture, social order and social change.

College of Staten Island

Criminology
Course Number: SOC 212
Spring | 4 credits

Sociological research and theory on crime and criminal behavior. Social, cultural, economic, and psychological factors affecting crime. The definition of crime in historical and cross-cultural perspectives: interpersonal violence, organized crime, corporate crime, and political violations of human rights. (social science)NOTE: This course satisfies the College Option.

College of Staten Island

Psychology
Course Number: PSY 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A study of the important facts and theories concerning human behavior and its motivation. Included will be: research methodology; at least three topics from learning, cognition, testing, physiology, and phenomenology; and at least three topics from personality, psychopathology, emotion and motivation, history and systems, development, and social factors. Topics will be related to major trends in recent cultural history and to current social and moral issues.

Hostos Community College

General Psychology
Course Number: PSY 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The student will demonstrate familiarity with the areas of psychology, including methods, learning and memory, sensation, perception, physiological processes, emotions, drives, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, individual differences, social behavior, and growth and development.

Hostos Community College

Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration
Course Number: CRJ 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The student will examine the roles and functions of institutions within the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels. Emphasis is placed on interactions between the police, the courts, the correctional institutions at the local level, and the influence of these institutions on the quality of life in the South Bronx community.

Hostos Community College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the basic topic of sociology, including social mobility, role status, race and prejudice, and factors leading to social change.

Hunter College

Introduction to Ethics
Course Number: PHILO 104
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Examination of standards of right conduct and the good life through study of selected philosophical classics.

Hunter College

Introduction to Psychology
Course Number: PSYCH 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to the problems, methods and concepts of psychology, covering a range of topics which characterize the discipline, including history, methodology and professional ethics, biological foundations, perception, motivation and emotion, learning, memory and thinking, individual differences, intelligence, personality, behavior disorders and their treatment, group processes.

Hunter College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Development of sociological imagination through introduction and application of basic concepts incorporating global and comparative perspectives.

Hunter College

People and Their Environment
Course Number: GEOG 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A broad overview of subjects and ideas in geography, possibly the most internally diverse of the social sciences. Covers the geographical aspects of topics including weather and climate, landforms, religions, food, cities, economics, culture, politics and much more. While students will be expected to understand the basics of each of the topics covered, the overarching emphasis will be on understanding the relationships among them. As such, the course builds from one topic to the next, ultimately stressing the sheer geographical complexity and wonder of modern life. interact with it. Contemporary economic, politi­cal and social patterns and problems are dis­cussed.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Career Development for the College Student
Course Number: CSL 110
Fall, Spring | 1 credit

A critical examination of different occupational areas combined with a realistic self-examination by students of their own needs, interests, and skills in order to formulate valid career choices. Emphasis on occupations in urban areas and careers in the criminal justice systems. Attention is also given to the career problems of women and members of minority groups. The course includes guest lecturers from governmental agencies and private industry. Students have minimum of one individual career planning session with the instructor.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Criminal Law and Investigation Workshop
Course Number: CNW_SOCS
0 credits

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

General Psychology I
Course Number: PSY 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A survey of human behavior with an emphasis on interpersonal processes. Subjects covered include personality and personality assessment; behavior pathology and treatment; behavioral aspects of motivation and emotion; social psychology; psychological research methods; applications of psychology.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Introduction to Anthropology
Course Number: ANT 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology, the study of human societies and cultures. Students will examine the concept of culture in historical and global perspective, and learn tools for cross-cultural comparative analysis with an emphasis on critical thinking in relation to cultural values and practices, variation in human behavior, the organization of social life, and the making of cultural identity. Cross-cultural topics include subsistence, power and law, gender, family and kinship, language and intercultural communication, and the impact of globalization on human societies. Students will also learn fundamental concepts in anthropology to better understand the causes and conditions of our contemporary world.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CRJ 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introductory survey of the American criminal justice system. Discussion of the police, defense and prosecuting attorneys, courts, institutional corrections, community-based corrections, and the juvenile justice system. The definition and the measurement of crime, and various efforts to explain the causes of crime. General issues for consideration include discretion in the administration of criminal justice; due process; and contemporary change in the American criminal justice system.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Introductory Sociology: Sociological Analysis
Course Number: SOC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The study of modern society: social groups, social organization, process of interaction, social disorganization, and change. Such topics as deviant behavior, social control, ethnic and class relations, culture and personality and urbanization are considered.

Kingsborough Community College

Behavioral and Social Science: The Individual & His/Her World
Course Number: BSS 1
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The concepts and methodologies of sociology, psychology, economics, political science and history helps students understand issues of current significance.

Kingsborough Community College

Conducting Research
Course Number: BEH 71
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

To carry out and bring to completion an individual research project in the areas of the Behavioral Sciences, course work includes actual testing of subjects and of hypotheses, collection of data, statistical analysis, assessing the implications of research findings for further investigation.

Kingsborough Community College

Crime and Punishment
Course Number: POL 64
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

To further education in criminal justice, focus will be on "Crime" and on "Punishment", the two major aspects of the criminal justice system. Course will consider the three sections: The Institution of Punishment, Crime and Criminals, Controlling Crime through Punishment

Kingsborough Community College

Event Catering Management
Course Number: TAH 43
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the basic skills and competencies required for catering, food and beverage operations, and the opportunities and responsibilities of this sector of the hospitality and tourism industry.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: POL 63
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States, includes study of crime and the three elements which comprise the criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections. Attention is given to civil liberties issues which involve the procedural due process rights of persons accused of crime.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Research
Course Number: BEH 70
Fall, Spring | 4 credits

To produce research projects in the Behavioral Sciences with the skill and knowledge necessary for carrying out individual research projects, students are familiarized with theoretical issues in scientific research, methodology, and statistical measurement.

Kingsborough Community College

Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality
Course Number: TAH 1
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Overview of the many and varied organizations and agencies that make up the travel and tourism industry, their roles and interrelationships. Topics include transportation, lodgings, restaurants, wholesale and retail operations, attractions, government owned parks and facilities, trade organizations, and governmental agencies.

LaGuardia Community College

General Psychology
Course Number: SSY 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This is an introduction to some of the major fields of study in the science of psychology. Areas covered include learning, perception, theories of personality, mental illness and therapy, social psychology, and the research methods of psychology.

LaGuardia Community College

Global Politics
Course Number: SSP 200
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course will investigate the dynamics of global politics among nation states and other actors in global affairs. After an introduction to the international system and globalization, the class will study major international relations theories and use them to analyze current and past events in global politics. The course will explore various global issues including war, terrorism, genocide, security, peacebuilding, development, human rights, free trade etc. Students will focus on case studies of their choice.

LaGuardia Community College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SSS 100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

This course offers students information and ideas with which to understand the social factors of human life. It places the study of social interaction, social processes, and social institutions in an historical context. It examines the human condition with particular reference to work, to culture, to personality, to ethnic, class and gender relations, as well as economic and political institutions.

Lehman College

Contemporary Political Issues
Course Number: POL 150
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An examination of key domestic and international problems from the perspective of political science.

Lehman College

Criminology
Course Number: SOC 230
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The nature and significance of crime as a social phenomenon. Study of the sociological factors that contribute to and maintain the criminal institutional structure and the justice system in the United States.

Lehman College

Fundamentals of Sociology
Course Number: SOC 166
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to sociological concepts and perspectives and their applications to societies in the modern world.

Lehman College

General Psychology
Course Number: PSY 166
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of modern psychology. Consideration of the scientific basis of psychology and of the significant problems in the areas of learning, motivation, emotion, individual differences, physiological bases of behavior, perception, developmental processes, personality, and social behavior.

Medgar Evers College

Introduction to Psychology
Course Number: PSYC 101
3 credits

This course is an introduction to several basic areas of study within psychology, specifically including concepts of perception, motivation, personality, learning, abnormal behavior and social psychology.

Medgar Evers College

Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 101
3 credits

This course will familiarize the student with the basic concepts in sociology and develop his/her appreciation of the nature and scope of the discipline. Emphasis will be centered on the critical importance of human interaction, inter-and intro group relations, cultural relativity, the process of socialization, race, caste and class stratification, and on sex, age, and other bases of differentiation. The structure of social organizations and of institutions and the nature of power, authority and status as well as the problem of social change will be analyzed.

New York City College of Technology

American Sign Language I
Course Number: ASL 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

American Sign Language I is a beginning course designed to develop skill in a form of manual communication used primarily by American-born deaf persons in interpersonal (face-to-face) relations. Emphasis will be placed on the use of the body for visually-based communications, and the structure, vocabulary and development of American Sign Language. An introduction to deaf culture is also provided.

New York City College of Technology

Introduction to Psychology
Course Number: PSY 1101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Methodology, history and theories of psychology, brain and behavior, neuropsychology, socialization, motivation, emotion, perception, learning, thinking, intelligence, personality and the adjustment processes, and social psychology.

New York City College of Technology

Psychology of Adjustment
Course Number: PSY 1100
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

General theories and methods of psychology, individual differences, failure of adjustment, psychological stress and coping mechanisms, personality, learning, mental health and mental hygiene, therapeutic techniques, behavior in work situations and current psychological problems.

Queensborough Community College

Criminology
Course Number: CRIM 102
Fall | 3 credits

An introduction to the study of crime. Focuses on theories and research concerning the nature, causes, treatment and prevention of crime

Queensborough Community College

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CRIM 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

A survey of the institutions and processes of the criminal justice system. Special emphasis on police, courts and corrections.

Queensborough Community College

Psychology
Course Number: PSYC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include research methods, biological bases of brain and mind, sensation-perception, sleep and states of consciousness, learning-memory, development, cognition-intelligence, motivation-emotion, personality, abnormal psychology-therapy, and social psychology. Research findings and principles related to everyday life.

Queensborough Community College

Psychology of Personal Adjustment
Course Number: PSYC 125
3 credits

Focus is on personal adjustment in an ongoing process of the normal individual. An examination of individual adjustment in terms of the psychological, developmental and socio-cultural dimensions of everyday living. A major concern is the practical application of psychological principals to the enhancement of personal adjustment. Main topics include the origins of adjustment, adjustment and identity, individual growth and change, social adjustment and problems of adjustment.

Queensborough Community College

Sociology
Course Number: SOCY 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introductory analysis and description of structure and dynamics of human society; special emphasis on application of scientific methods of observation and analysis of social groups, intergroup relations, social change, social stratification, and social institutions.

Queens College

General Introduction to Sociology
Course Number: SOC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts, theories, methods, and findings of sociology that help describe and explain the socio-political, socio-economic, cultural, and organizational structures of society.

Queens College

Urban Issues: Poverty and Affluence
Course Number: URBST 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the field of urban studies investigating why cities are places of economic and political opportunity for some and of deprivation, discrimination, violence, and impoverishment for others. Exploration of different theories of urban poverty and inequality and examination of the impact of immigration, racial segregation, suburbanization, public policies, and social movements on U.S. cities and their inhabitants. Special attention is paid to the existence of inequalities based on race, class, gender, sexuality and analyzes proposals to reduce these inequalities.

York College

History of the Modern World Since 1815
Course Number: HIST 100
Fall | 3 credits

Studies the development of the Western World from the end of the Napoleonic Age to the present within the context of global history; considers the concurrent rise of the Americas, Asia and Africa.

York College

Introductory Psychology
Course Number: PSY 102
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Basic concepts and methods of contemporary psychology emphasizing the biological basis of behavior, learning, cognition, consciousness, development, stress and personality, abnormal behavior, group behavior, and social interaction.

York College

Introductory Sociology
Course Number: SOC 101
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

Introduction to the basic premises of sociology; the role of social factors as a determinant of human behavior; the formation and function of social institutions; the logic of sociological inquiry.

York College

Medical Anthropology
Course Number: ANTH 152
Fall, Spring | 3 credits

The relationship of culture to nutrition and disease and an analysis of primitive and folk medical practices.

York College

The Caribbean Since Columbus
Course Number: HIST 277
Spring | 3 credits

Historical account of the experiences of peoples in the Caribbean from European colonization to the present, with emphasis on socio-economic and political problems.

Drug Use & Abuse
Course Number: ANT 110
3 credits

Feminism
Course Number: POLSC 25000
0 credits

Gender in Anth Persp LEC
Course Number: ANTHC 30100
0 credits

Intro:Human Evolution LEC
Course Number: ANTHP 10100
0 credits

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Number: CRJ 101
Fall, Spring | 0 credits

Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Course Number: WGS 10000
0 credits

Introduction to Sociology: Sociological Analysis
Course Number: SOC 101
0 credits

Philosophy Politics & Society LEC
Course Number: PHILO 10600
0 credits

Psychology of Human Sexuality LEC
Course Number: PSYCH 17000
0 credits